Photo courtesy of @CanBorderPRA

After nearly 35 year of public service, Wayne Brown is calling it a career. 

"I started my career as an immigration officer at North Portal in January of 1983 but I was working with Citizenship and Immigration Canada at that time. I worked there as an officer and served as a national trainer and use of force instructor until about September of 2002 when I moved to Regina in an acting assignment as a manager of the Inland Citizenship and Immigration Office there."

"Then in 2003, I became permanent manager and manged that inland enforcement unit at the airport and citizenship and I stayed there until 2007 when I was appointed to the position of Chief of Operations for the Saskatchewan District and I was stationed at North Portal. and responsible for all the ports along the Saskatchewan border and the Regina airport."

"I started in North Portal and I ended up in North Portal in 2007 and it was really a great honour, I was happy to return to North Portal. I had an exceptional group of people that are so dedicated and committed to the job so I enjoyed going back."

He adds that after 35 years, he has seen a lot of changes.

"I think the two main areas that I think change has been significant, one is in technology and the other is in operational policy. When I started, back in '83, we had no computers. There was just a typewriter and a telex machine. We had no access to national and international data-banks. Basically we had to rely on our interviewing techniques and our ability to determine admissibility and determine if someone is being forthright and open and honest. Which, in some ways, looking back, was a great learning opportunity to enhance your interviewing skills."

"I clearly recall when we acquired a word processing machine in the office and we no longer had to type over the same letter many times to correct a mistake and no longer needed white-out."

He adds that another big change was moving from an unarmed workforce to an armed workforce.

"For a number of years we had no defensive equipment and when I started there were no protective vests, batons I think all we had was one set of handcuffs in the office. We were still responsible for enforcing the immigration legislation back then and we had to arrest borders jumpers off a train, or crossing through open fields or those who were inadmissible at the port of entry and had to be detained, I used to have to use my own personal vehicle to transport detainees to the RCMP holding cells in Estevan. I can't even imagine that anymore."

He believes that that policy has changed how CBSA officers interact with the public.

"I believe that once we moved into the armed workforce, there's much more of a need to make sure that proper conduct and how we interact with people is much more respectful and much more professional because wearing those tools on your uniform certainly requires that officers maintain the utmost professionalism."

No career would be complete without a few interesting moments. He relayed that he should have kept a journal but unfortunatly wouldn't be able to share very much due to privacy concerns and the sensitive nature of his work. However, he was able to share one interesting anecdote form early in his career when the large carnival was passing through the border on its way into Canada.

"It was a big mid-way production there would be approximately 120-140 carnival workers from all walks of life that would be processed. This very large gentleman, probably 6"10' -11' and looked mean to me. He approached the counter so I said hello and asked him for his identification and he handed me his San Quintin Prison ID card, it was the only identification he had. And you have to remember, we had no defensive equipment back then and I knew i had to break it to him gently, the news that he wasn't going to be allowed entry into Canada. I believe he was convicted of manslaughter."

He  continued on to say as everyone stopped to watch what he would do, he asked the man what he thought he should do?

The man responded that he figured that he was probably going to be refused.

"I just said, "I'm glad you agree." And we processed him and got him on his way and he gave me a big toothless smile and left without any incident."

He believes that by treating people with courtesy and respect and leaving them their dignity was a very import aspect of the job.

He also recounted a story of when he was a manager at CIC Regina, and was involved with the deportation of Dr John Schneeberger, a Kipling doctor who had injected another person's blood into himself to avoid DNA detection. That case received lots of attention and was later made into a movie.

As well, he has met numerous celebrities and musicians passing through the border either on tour, or on their way to Craven. 

"One that stands out is meeting Johnny Cash and having a chance to sit down and chat with him. It was later in his career and I thought that he was one person that was so soft spoken and humble and one person who had a presence about him."

He enjoyed his caeer very much so it took him a few minutes to think about what he liked best about the border but finally came back with an answer.

"I enjoyed the spontaneous and unpredictable situations that we would deal with everyday. Everyday was different. I clearly recall driving to work after 19-20 years on working at the border one morning and commenting how I still loved going to work and I loved my job and I believe it was because no day was the same and the unpredictability of what would happen that day."

"And I worked with a great bunch of people and the commradaire working with a group of people who are passionate about what they do was an enjoyable part of the job too."

Wayne Brown is also the Head Instructor of the Estvan Taekwondo Club and he feels that that has influenced his career.

"I've been in public service for just shy of 35 years and I've been studying and teaching taekwondo for about 31 years. It was a great fit when I first started especially as it relates to an enforcement environment. The practice of taekwondo allowed me to transfer some of these skills to becoming a use of force instructor with CIC. But I think most importantly, taekwondo taught me patience, discipline and the confidence that I believe made me a better officer and a better manager. The tenets (courtesy, integrity, perseverance, self control , indomitable spirit) have played a huge role in my career because it becomes a way of life. 

He mentioned that in the last four years, he was the head of the leadership development program for the prairie region and he believes that he was able to be successful in that due to what he has learned over the three decades of training in the martial art. 

He added that he would encourage anyone interested in a career in law enforcement, to consider the Canada Border Services Agency.

Brown add that he doesn't know if the reality of retirement has sunk in yet but he knows that he will miss his coworkers the most out of everything from his career. However, he is looking forward to spending  more time with family and friends.

 

More Local News

Accident On Friday Night

An accident on Friday evening kept Emergency crews busy. "At approximately 11 pm on January 18th, Estevan Police and Estevan Fire were called to the scene of a single vehicle collision," explains…

New Look for Canadian Dollar in 2019: Will Honour Gay Rights

Joe Wickenhauser is the Executive Director of Moose Jaw PRIDE and the Saskatchewan PRIDE Network. 2019 marks the 50th anniversary of the decriminalization of homosexuality in Canada. To commemorate…

SaskPower Pleased With Performance Of CCS at Boundary Dam Power Station

SaskPower’s carbon capture and storage facility at the Boundary Dam Power Station had a great year in 2018, according to their vice president of power production, Howard Matthews. The facility…

Millions for Crop Research in Saskatchewan

On Wednesday, the federal Minister of Agriculture Lawrence MacAulay and Saskatchewan Agriculture Minister David Marit announced more than $12 million in funding for forty-four crop-related research…

Humane Society Receives Big Boost With $5000 Grant

The humane society has recently received a $5000 grant from the Western Financial western community foundation. Angela Prette with the humane society was extremely happy with the amount of the grant…

Bitter Winds Sticking Around

After some balmy temperatures and days to start the new year, more traditional Saskatchewan weather has moved in for the third week of January. Cold days and even colder nights with bitter winds is…

Snowplow Safety Important For Everyone

With the lack of snowfall we've seen in the southeast corner of the province, it's easy to forget about the drivers that keep the roads clear and drivers safe. Snowplow operators are often overlooked…

Accident On 13th Ave and King Street

A two-vehicle collision took place early Wednesday morning. "At approximately 7:45 this morning, a two-vehicle collision occurred at the intersection of 13th Avenue and King Street," explained…

The Difference Between Norovirus and Influenza Explained

Norovirus has been identified as the cause of a number of cases of nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting in the province. "Norovirus is a type of virus that affects the intestinal system," explained Doctor…

City's Proposed 2019 Budget Includes No Increase In Taxes Or Utility Rates

The city is planning some ambitious ideas for the proposed 2019 budget, but they won’t be including any higher taxes or utlility increases. The proposed budget was prepared by city administration and…

DiscoverEstevan.com is Estevan's only source for community news and information such as weather and classifieds.

Search the Biz Guide

Login